The Gospel in a Word

The Gospel in a Word

If you had to summarize the gospel in a word, what would it be? Forgiveness? Justification? Salvation? Perhaps the best answer would be “Christ,” as long as we understand that His person and work are both included, and it is His work in particular that constitutes the...
How Can I Know if I’m Saved?

How Can I Know if I’m Saved?

One of the most common issues I have dealt with in pastoral counseling, especially during my years on the mission field where many were coming to faith, is believers who struggle with doubts concerning their salvation. We know that salvation is God’s gift to us by...
Audio: The Problem of Evil and Goodness of God

Audio: The Problem of Evil and Goodness of God

The problem of evil was initially raised by the Greek philosopher Epicurus and was popularized by the skeptical philosopher David Hume. Hume put it like this: “Is [God] willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is impotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing: whence then is evil?” His question is meant to cast doubt on the existence of God.
The problem of evil is often recognized as the greatest challenge for biblical theism. From the outset we must confess that we cannot penetrate the secret counsel of the mind of God. Scripture gives us light, but it does not give us a full answer to the “Why?” question. It gives us what we need to know, not necessarily all that we would like to know. So the answer of Scripture is not exhaustive, but it certainly is sufficient for a well-grounded, informed, and reasonable faith. Deuteronomy 29:29, “The secret things belong to the LORD our God, but those things which are revealed belong to us and to our children forever, that we may do all the words of this law.”

Sermon: A Well-Grounded Assurance of Faith (Rom. 5:1–5)

Sermon: A Well-Grounded Assurance of Faith (Rom. 5:1–5)

A well-grounded assurance of faith is a heaven of delight in the heart of believers this side of eternity. The Apostle Paul teaches that believers rejoice in tribulation because of the joy of a well-grounded assurance, an assurance enjoyed subjectively and grounded objectively on the Word and promises of God. The doctrine of justification should be embraced and relished such that it yields sweet comfort and consolation in our hearts by the power of the Holy Spirit, for we know that Christ’s perfect righteousness is imputed to believers and they will never perish. We can be free from the haunting guilt of past shame and the fear of death because our salvation is perfect, perpetual, and permanent, based on the righteousness of Jesus Christ alone.